Campus Technology Conferences REGISTER
AGENDASESSIONS

[2016 Program Materials]
Breakout Sessions
For Agenda At-A-Glance click here.
 
Workshops - Monday, July 17

8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

WS1 Current Trends for the Future of Education Technology

Bryan Alexander, President, Bryan Alexander Consulting LLC

During this workshop based on his long-running Future Trends in Technology and Education report, Bryan Alexander will explore present trends to extrapolate the future of higher education technology. The workshop will present cutting-edge, longitudinally informed research and activities that encourage you to consider how policy, economics, demographics and educational technologies are shaping your institution, community and life. Alexander will also examine trends and developments including social media, mobile, blockchain, artificial intelligence, evolutions in learning management and more.

WS2 Creating Immersive Learning Experiences With Apps, AR and VR

Yingjie Liu, Instructional Designer, San Jose State University

Through hands-on demonstrations, you will learn how to create immersive learning experiences using apps, augmented reality and virtual reality. Yingjie Liu will lead a discussion of best practices in instructional design for virtual reality derived from a recent project at San Jose State University.  You will also explore challenges and best practices for instructional design and technology support training.

WS3 Faculty Development: Lessons Learned and Innovations Ahead

W. Gardner Campbell, Associate Professor and Special Assistant to the Provost, Virginia Commonwealth University

Sustainable and effective change through campus technology requires faculty ready and able to adopt new methods and new designs to effectively improve learning. Developed from W. Gardner Campbell’s experience leading faculty technology development programs at Virginia Commonwealth University, this workshop offers a “how-to,”  “how-not-to,” and “how-might-we” approach to the issue. You’ll discuss new tactics for faculty development and develop a network of aspirational colleagues with whom you can continue to collaborate long after the conference is over.

1 – 4 p.m.

WS4 Digital Storytelling for Education: The State of the Art

Bryan Alexander, President, Bryan Alexander Consulting LLC

This workshop explores what digital storytelling has to offer higher education. Bryan Alexander, author of The New Digital Storytelling: Creating Narratives with New Media, will examine the various technologies currently in use — including storytelling platforms like social media and gaming. You will analyze how digital storytelling works in practice, with examination of questions of pedagogy, curricular integration, support strategies and institutional commitments.

WS5 GET REAL: How to Use Augmented and Virtual Reality Apps in the Classroom

Mark Frydenberg, Senior Lecturer in Computer Information Systems and Director of CIS Learning and Technology Sandbox, Bentley University

Augmented and virtual reality technologies have introduced new forms of engagement, and this workshop will survey popular tools for creating virtual and augmented reality experiences. Mark Frydenberg will share student-created examples of augmented reality experiences, and discuss ways that augmented and virtual reality can be used in a variety of educational settings. Using freely available mobile and web apps, you will have the opportunity to create augmented or virtual reality learning experiences for your classrooms.

In order to fully participate in this workshop, please bring a laptop and mobile device. Don’t forget your chargers!


 

WS6 Creating Collaborative Learning Activities Using Wireless Indoor Location Devices

Mark Moldwin, Professor and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan                                                                                                                        
Perry Samson,
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Atmospheric Science, University of Michigan; Co-Founder of Lecture Tools and Weather Underground

Learn about the new Wireless Indoor Location Device (WILD) Learning System developed as part of NASA’s weather prediction project. You will participate in an activity to simulate a hurricane and then work in teams to imagine new uses for this unique platform for kinesthetic learning.

WS7 Using Player Types to Engage Students Through Gameful Design

Scott Reinke, Coordinator for Ball State Achievements, Ball State University

Following his team’s Gamification World Conference 2016 award for Best Education Project, Scott Reinke returns to Campus Technology to discuss how game design addresses issues related to student motivation. You will learn how game designers use Player Type models to inform design decisions. Plus, you’ll discuss problems specific to your higher education institution and brainstorm with partners to determine which gamified models and systems might offer effective solutions.


 

CIO: Next Generation

Tuesday,July 18
11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m.

CIO1 CHECS 2017 CIO Research Premiere

Wayne Brown, Vice President of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, Excelsior College

Wayne Brown will once again premiere the results from his respected ongoing longitudinal higher education technology leadership research. Based on data from hundreds of chief information officers, information technology specialists and members of institutional management teams nationwide, the 2017 Center for Higher Education Chief Information Officer Studies, Inc. report examines the training and institutional backgrounds of current CIOs, expectations of the position by other institutional leaders, and steps future technology leaders are taking or may take to prepare for careers as CIOs. Using insights from his research, publications, work with the CHECS advisory board, and his years as a CIO practitioner in higher education and the United States Air Force, Brown will give you recommendations on how to prepare and compete for the CIO positions of the future.

Tuesday, July 18   
1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

CIO2 Transforming an IT Service Delivery Organization

Bruce Callow, Chief Technology Officer, Griffith University

As global markets shift, legislative compliance produces challenges, and service delivery models change, higher education institutions must transform or wither. In order to survive, universities are looking to respond quickly with changes to learning, teaching and research delivery practices. This response is underpinned and delivered through a digital environment that must be agile, flexible and aligned. Bruce Callow will outline the four-part framework being implemented at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia to transform its Information Services to a new model of service delivery.

Tuesday, July 18
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

CIO3 Planning for a Career in Higher Education Technology Leadership

Joy Hatch, Vice President for Technology, Fort Hays State University

This session is designed for information technology professionals who aspire to careers in technology leadership.  Discussion will include how to shift your mindset from programming and technical aspects to a leadership mindset.  Joy Hatch will outline strategies and pathways to build the skills and experience necessary for success.

Tuesday, July 18
3:15 – 4 p.m.

CIO4 Derailing the Data Center Disaster

Ron Baker, Assistant Vice Chancellor and Deputy Chief Information Officer, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Tom Hoover, Associate Vice Chancellor and Chief Information Officer, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) has undergone a great amount of change over the last several years.  IT lost 25% of its staff due to an early retirement program.  Meanwhile, key staff members left for corporate institutions.  IT has used these challenges in staffing as opportunities to assess the needs of its data center.  Ron Baker and Tom Hoover will describe the path UTC took to create a next generation data center, as well as the other benefits this process has created for the entire IT organization and the institution.

Wednesday, July 19    
10:45 – 11:30 a.m.

CIO5 Enabling Remote Learning With Engineering and Design Tools Through Graphics-Optimized VDI Success

Michael Goay, Executive Director of Information Technology, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California

Higher education continues to face challenges as a more geographically distributed student body grows and expands to include more non-traditional students. Combinations of on-campus and online courses are being deployed to meet student needs, and IT departments must adapt to support the increasing variety of end-user devices, tools needed by students and faculty, and demands for remote access to graphics-intensive applications. Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) with graphics optimization has the potential to deliver cutting-edge performance beyond the physical computing lab. Michael Goay will address how to avoid common pitfalls associated with VDI and meet course delivery needs while reducing desktop support, management and security costs.

Wednesday, July 19  
1 – 1:45 p.m.

CIO6 Creative Leadership: A Human-centered Approach to Building Technologies

Jeff Scheire, Partner, MO Studio
Sue Tan, Partner, MO Studio
James Vasquez, Associate Dean and Chief Information Officer, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California
Dennis Wang, Partner, MO Studio

Student and stakeholder engagement throughout the strategic development process is essential to creating technology that is relevant, effective and forward-looking. Taking a human-centered approach, the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism partnered with innovation and strategy firm MO Studio to redesign an annual Student Technology Survey. Initially designed as a tool to collect basic usage data, it is now being used as a platform to increase student engagement. By building student empathy, focusing on collaborative design and generating insight, the school is able to better understand how students learn and faculty  teach and to use this understanding to drive better technology decisions. The team will share the story of the approach, outcomes and impact of this process on the school’s ongoing strategic effort to develop an innovative technology roadmap.

 

Wednesday, July 19    
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

CIO7 Modernizing the ERP

Camille Shelley, Executive Director, Office of Information Technology, Brookdale Community College

Brookdale Community College is reengineering its enterprise resource planning system to improve interactions among people, processes and technology. As part of this process, the school has removed customizations from the existing system. Camille Shelley will describe the framework used to meet project goals and objectives as well as how she and her team are working to create an environment of continuous improvement.

IT Leadership and Policy

Tuesday, July 18
11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m.

ILP1 Strategic Planning in IT Onboarding

Susan Lazenby, Director of IT Projects and Strategic Planning, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Barbara Webb, Manager of Strategic Planning for IT, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Several reorganizations and a 20% reduction in the IT workforce following voluntary retirements in 2015 made it clear: The IT Office for Projects and Strategic Planning at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga needed to increase employee retention. The office developed a six-month onboarding process with the goals of increasing new hire buy-in and developing an environment where staff wanted to grow and give back. Learn how employees, managers, peer mentors and members of the leadership team have worked together to improve retention by developing a framework that includes peer mentorship, teams working together to ensure two-way communication, instant feedback, positive growth and ongoing assessment.
Tuesday, July 18
1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

ILP2 A Framework for Getting Value From Your Institutional Data

James Kulich, Director, Masters in Data Science Program, Elmhurst College

James Kulich will share lessons from other industries that higher education institutions can use to improve their analytical efforts. CRISP-DM, the cross-industry standard protocol for data mining, identifies organizational needs and opportunities; gathers and prepares good data to feed predictive models that are accurate, stable and relevant; and ensures that predictive modeling efforts will yield effective change and measurable institutional value. James Kulich will examine a case study from Elmhurst College to illustrate how CRISP-based models can improve sales or enhance client satisfaction and how these principles can be applied to key issues in higher education, including student recruitment, retention and improved learning outcomes.

Tuesday, July 18
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

ILP3 Strategizing the Future of Higher Education Technology

Marjorie Boursiquot, Assistant Vice President for Business Process Integration, Georgetown University

Cloud computing has changed higher education technology and its support model.  Enterprise systems in the cloud have blurred the lines between process and system; significantly changed the skills required to support and use enterprise systems; drastically increased the pace of change; and significantly changed training methods. Learn how Georgetown University embraced cloud computing and transformed its processes, resources, change management and training methods in order to achieve its vision of agility, accessibility, simplicity, transparency, efficiency and modernization.

Tuesday, July 18
3:15 – 4 p.m.

ILP4
Don’t Pave the Cow Path: Analyze Business Processes to Improve Technology

Jane Courcy, Senior Consultant, Management and Information Technology, BerryDunn
Taylor Gray, Director of Project Management, California Western School of Law

In preparation for an upcoming new ERP system selection, leadership at California Western School of Law recognized the need to better understand their business processes across more than 25 administrative and academic departments. Working with BerryDunn, they designed a 9-month project called SPUR (Software Process Update and Review) to assess current operations, map “as-is” and “to-be” business processes, and identify potential improvements. The presenters will review specific methods, tools and documentation used for business process improvement projects to help you strategize your own business process improvement efforts.

Wednesday, July 19  
10:45 – 11:30 a.m.

ILP5 Managing Through Organizational Changes in IT

Chris Brezil, Assistant Vice President of Enterprise Operations in IT, The New School
Lillian Sartori, Assistant Vice President for EduServices in IT, The New School

Higher education is going through dramatic shifts in its business. In many cases, this directly affects the customer support model. The New School is transforming into a customer-focused institution, and you'll hear from two leaders of the effort how the transformation has affected information technology, what this has meant for staff and how it has affected team management. There will also be time for attendees to share their responses to their own organizational challenges.

Wednesday, July 19  
1 – 1:45 p.m.

ILP6 Stop Outs: The Forgotten Students

Mary Hawkins, President, Bellevue University
Nitzan Pelman
, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, ReUp Education

Bellevue University and ReUp Education are working together to increase student success by reenrolling and supporting students in comprehensive ways.  Learn how Bellevue University has implemented new infrastructure for student support and how ReUp Education is enhancing the university’s efforts by using technology to supplement human coaches.  Using predictive analytics and proprietary technology, ReUp locates former students who left without degrees, helps them with budgeting and encourages reenrollment, and sets up automated chat bots and e-mails and other reminders to help students develop in their university programs.  Learn new strategies to help students stay on track and enhance your university’s retention rates and enrollment.

Thursday, July 20      
10 – 10:45 a.m.

ILP7 Cultivating Your IT Organization: Strategic Decision-making to Improve Efficiency

Brian Fodrey, Assistant Dean for Information Technology, University of North Carolina School of Government

Due to information technology’s ever-increasing complexity, it is a challenge to provide end users with a simplified process if the IT division is not organized as effectively as possible. Divisions might struggle due to juggling a growing service portfolio, challenging fiscal climates and uncertainty surrounding employee retention. Brian Fodrey will offer a plan that chief information officers can use to evaluate, improve and streamline their organizations. You’ll discover how, using appropriate resources such as shared services, IT leaders can manage multifaceted systems to work better for both IT practitioners and end-users.

IT in the Digital Age



Tuesday, July 18
11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m.

ITD1 Using Analytics to Determine Action, Affect Change and Measure Success

Robert Brennan, Teaching and Learning Specialist, University of Alberta, Augustana

Opportunities to turn data into useful information are often overlooked. Learn how the University of Alberta, Augustana found, composed and curated sources of data. The creation of powerful analytics reshaped the program and led to purposeful change on the campus. Robert Brennan will identify where to find sources of analyzable data and explain the value of anonymous surveys for baseline data. You’ll also learn how analyzing multiple data sources can help you to question and alter preconceived notions and the effectiveness of your technology training initiative.

Tuesday, July 18
1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

ITD2 Making Meaningful Apps in Higher Education

Scott Reinke, Coordinator for Ball State Achievements, Ball State University
Ro-Anne Royer Engle
, Interim Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Services, Ball State University
Katie Slabaugh
, Associate Dean of Students/Title IX Coordinator, Ball State University


The Student Affairs and Enrollment Services group of Ball State University has designed mobile apps that target key student issues. Over the past three years, working with students and incorporating their input, the unit has developed and deployed apps that enable sexual assault and bias reporting, promote diversity and inclusion, and enhance the success and retention of low-income students. Hear directly from the project leaders, who will share the results of their work and lead an interactive discussion of how apps can be used for maximum impact on student lives.

Tuesday, July 18
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

ITD3 Developing and Implementing an Online Research Data Repository

Ray Uzwyshyn, Director of Collections and Digital Services, Texas State University

Data-driven research has become the norm for university and college faculty and student research. Most federal and many international granting agencies mandate that any researcher applying for a public grant make their research data public through online access. Using Texas State University’s participation in the Texas Data Repository as an example, Ray Uzwyshyn will present a pragmatic overview of online research data repositories and implementation strategies that allow academic organizations to  develop and build online data research repositories quickly and efficiently.

Tuesday, July 18   
3:15 – 4 p.m.

ITD4 Measuring Student Success: What Higher Ed Can Learn From FitBit

Paul Dosal, Vice Provost for Student Success, University of South Florida
Kristen Eshleman
, Director of Digital Innovation, Davidson College
Mark Milliron
, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning
Fred Singer
, Chief Executive Officer, Echo360


What gets measured gets improved. We are tracking activity like never before using wearables to measure steps and sleep. This data leads to greater awareness, which, in turn, perpetuates positive changes in user behavior. What if we applied this same concept by measuring activity in the classroom? Research shows that the more a student is engaged in class, the better he or she does in the course. Hear how behavioral data from the classroom, like learning management system engagement during the first weeks of class, note-taking and reviewing recorded lectures, can offer real-time insights about student success and transform the teaching and learning experience.

Wednesday, July 19
10:45 – 11:30 a.m.

ITD5 Toward a Smart Campus: Implementing an Internet of Things Infrastructure and Applications

May Chang, Library Chief Technology Officer, University of Cincinnati
Mehdi Mohammadi
, Graduate Assistant, University Libraries, Western Michigan University


Western Michigan University Libraries developed an Internet of Things environment to facilitate prototyping and implementing Internet of Things applications and services.  May Chang and Mehdi Mohammadi will review aspects of developing an Internet of Things infrastructure and applications.  They will also discuss challenges related to technology interoperability and big data.

Wednesday, July 19
1 – 1:45 p.m.

ITD6 Creating a Positive Outlook With Change Management

Joy Hatch, Vice President for Technology, Fort Hays State University
Jackie Ruder
, Director of Enterprise Applications, Fort Hays State University

A new enterprise resource planning implementation will either be a catalyst for positive change and improved services or lead to fear and frustration.  In order to increase efficiency and effectiveness of services across campus, Fort Hays State University selected Workday to replace its mainframe and home-grown systems.  The speakers will discuss the Workday implementation to date and will explain how change management is at the heart of the implementation and is an integral component of getting buy-in from all sectors of the campus community.
Wednesday, July 19
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

ITD7 Using Splunk to Increase Student Success at UNLV

Matt Bernacki, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Higher Education, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Cam Johnson
, Operations Center Manager, University of Nevada, Las Vegas


The University of Nevada, Las Vegas has relied on machine data analytics to troubleshoot and manage the operational efficiency of its IT networks for several years. More recently, the school repurposed its data to identify at-risk students and improve academic outcomes. What started as an IT troubleshooting solution is now helping solve strategic problems for the university. UNLV’s innovative use of analytic software to identify students who may underachieve exemplifies the impact machine data and predictive analytics can deliver to universities around the world. Discover how existing data can be used to share and describe student learning events, propose data models to predict student achievement, and plan early warning and learning strategy programs for students at risk of poor performance.

Thursday, July 20    
10 – 10:45 a.m.

ITD8 The Future of Student Engagement in a Tech-Enabled World

Moderator: Andrew Chaifetz, Chief Executive Officer, NoteBowl
India Anderson, Student, Denison University                                              
Bobby Craig, Student, Denison University
Maxwell Richter, Director of School Partnerships, Student Voice
Donnie Sendelbach, Director of Educational Technology Services, Denison University
Dena Speranza, Chief Information Officer, Denison University

When new technologies begin with the student perspective, it is possible for student engagement to expand beyond the classroom. This panel discussion will explore ways for technology and student leaders to partner in the evaluation of new technologies in order to deliver high-quality, highly personalized services that help faculty, staff and students engage more effectively. You’ll discover ways to involve students in decision making, learn about Denison University’s use of student ambassadors in the implementation of new technologies, and hear directly from students and administrators about ways to improve student engagement.

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

Tuesday, July 18    
11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m.

TLD1 Not All Digital Curriculum Is Created Equal: Can You Tell the Difference?

Gates Bryant, Partner, Tyton Partners
Tomas B. Cavanagh
, Associate Vice President of Distributed Learning, University of Central Florida
Cristi Ford
, Associate Provost, Center for Innovation in Learning and Student Success, University of Maryland University College


Courseware exists in a maze of digital tools, each promising to improve learning outcomes, save time, reduce cost and more. The Courseware in Context (CWiC) Framework helps educators navigate the courseware market and make better-informed adoption and implementation decisions. This session demonstrates the interactive framework (built on the Lea(R)n digital platform) and highlights two different cases where it can be applied — selecting a new courseware product and evaluating courseware products already in use. You’ll also hear how institutional leaders have used the CWiC Framework on their campuses so you can adapt their successful approaches for your own efforts.

Tuesday, July 18
1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

TLD2 Two Sides of the Digital Literacy Coin: Video’s Effect on Student Learning

Kelly Dempsey, Learning Technologist, Colgate University                                                                     
Sarah Kunze, Senior Instructional Technologist, Colgate University

Video continues to grow in importance at Colgate University. From occasional pre-recorded lectures to Lightboard videos used for daily instruction, Colgate faculty are using video on a regular basis to capture student attention and deliver content. Students are using video to create about 200 projects each semester, including digital stories and scientific reports. Learn why faculty use and assign videos, and how Academic Technologies supports these video learning efforts.

Tuesday, July 18    
3:15 – 4 p.m.

TLD3 Terraforming the Academic Terrain

Mary Beth Foster, Educational Technology Coordinator, Strategic Alternative Learning Techniques Center, University of Arizona
Rudy Molina Jr., Director, Strategic Alternative Learning Techniques Center, University of Arizona

Discover the educational technology that bolsters student success at the SALT Center, which provides academic support services to students with learning and attention challenges at the University of Arizona. The presenters will demonstrate apps and tools that empower students to transform their learning environment into accessible terrain, with discussion of key topics including audio note taking, text to speech, speech to text, mind mapping, and study and research apps. You’ll hear firsthand how the SALT space was transformed to incorporate technology that promotes collaboration and multisensory interactivity.

Wednesday, July 19    
10:45 – 11:30 a.m.

TLD4 Making the Case: Facility With Data for Everyone

James Kulich, Director, Masters in Data Science Program, Elmhurst College

Developing facility with data is no longer a narrow technical exercise. It has become an essential skill for students seeking careers in virtually any profession. Today’s organizations can only attain the benefits promised by modern data by tapping a broad range of skills and perspectives to create new opportunities for students and new imperatives for educators. James Kulich will highlight ways in which instructional designers, faculty from any discipline and academic leaders can enhance curricula by including perspectives on understanding, using and effectively communicating about data.

Wednesday, July 19    
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

TLD5 Making the Most of Multimedia

Stefanie “Nikki” Holden, Instructional Designer, University of Cincinnati
JP Leong
, Multimedia Coordinator, University of Cincinnati


Technological advances have put multimedia directly into the hands of faculty and students. It is not uncommon to find video lectures, interactive modules, audio/video assignment feedback, and other multimedia tools used in both online and face-to-face courses. Learn how to take your multimedia content to the next level. This presentation explains how to use audio, images and video effectively to make your presentations and courses more engaging. Additionally, you’ll see examples of mini-lecture videos, audio feedback and screencasts from faculty at the University of Cincinnati.

Thursday, July 20     
10 – 10:45 a.m.

TLD6 Using Digital Storytelling as a Strategy to Enhance Online and F2F Student Engagement

Blessing Diala-Ogamba, Professor of English, Coppin State University

The key to online teaching and learning is student participation and engagement. Although many students are engaged in social media, this engagement may not have much to do with what is required in a classroom setting. By meeting students where they are, teachers are able to engage students and encourage their participation in the online learning process. Learn how to use digital storytelling as a strategy that, combined with several web 2.0 tools, enhances student engagement in online and face-to-face classes.

Technology Solutions

Tuesday, July 18
3:15 – 4 p.m.

TS4 From Scattered to Scale: How the University of Arizona Learned to Manage 2TB of New Lecture Capture Video Every Week

Ari Bixhorn, VP Technical Evangelism, Panopto
Mark Felix, Director of Instructional Support, Office of Instruction and Assessment, University of Arizona

Faculty at the University of Arizona produce 2TB of video every week, totaling more than 30 thousand hours of recorded lectures, classrooms, presentations and more each year. It wasn’t always this way, as different departments experimented with different solutions to support different objectives. Learn how Arizona took action to make video easier for faculty to use, students to consume and administrators to support across campus. Ari Bixhorn and Mark Felix will discuss how the university identified stakeholders and technical requirements, how the Office of Instruction and Assessment designed its pilot and faculty training initiatives, and their top technical recommendations for balancing costs and efficiency while operating a massive and growing video library.
Online and Blended Learning

Tuesday, July 18   
1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

OBL1 Supporting Online/Blended Learning

Andrew Topper, Associate Professor of Special Education, Foundations, and Technology, Grand Valley State University

Many institutions struggle to support faculty effectively as they migrate toward blended/online course formats. Andrew Topper will share experiences developing, implementing and evaluating a fully online graduate degree, and examine why traditional institutional support may not be effective for the successful transition to technology-based teaching environments. You will also learn effective practices for faculty development in support of hybrid/online courses.

Tuesday, July 18   
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

OBL2 Adopting a Learning Object Initiative Designed for Student Success

Ann Palazzo, Professor of English and Distance Learning Faculty Fellow, Columbus State Community College

The Digital Pathways initiative at Columbus State Community College enables faculty to create state-of-the-art digital content (learning objects) and to employ interactive delivery methods that enhance student engagement. As one of the largest community colleges in Ohio and a leader in distance learning, Columbus State has formed a collaboration with Apple that provides faculty, as curators of information, the tools and knowledge to enhance the overall teaching and learning process. You will hear the challenges involved in creating a college-wide initiative that will meet the needs of millennial learners and analyze examples of interactive learning objects used in courses to discover how they have impacted student learning.

Wednesday, July 19    
 1 – 1:45 p.m.

OBL3 If We Build It, Will They Come? How Duke University Created a Continuing Education Program, Start to Finish

Glenn Setliff, Director of Information Technology, Duke University School of Nursing

Health care professionals are required to earn educational credits throughout their careers to maintain licensure, move into specialties, advance their careers and grow as professionals. Therefore, continuing education is a growth opportunity for institutions that already provide educational resources to health professionals. The decision to create a continuing education program from scratch creates a range of challenges. Glenn Setliff will examine the conversations and decision-making processes at the heart of building a program. Additionally, he will explain the educational, financial, marketing and technological considerations involved, identifying critical elements, time costs and challenges as well as projections and criteria for the program’s success.

Wednesday, July 19  
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

OBL4 Accelerating Online Program Adoption

Mitch Golden, Chief Operating Officer, Noodle Partners
Brian Parish
, Chief Executive Officer, iData

Online program solutions must manage many parts of an academic program: recruiting, admissions, online coursework, retention, advising, student information systems, analytics, content development, course media, student support, and more.  The presenters will discuss the importance of developing open standards that create a well-defined, pragmatic path for interoperability of these critical tools so that data will flow seamlessly between learning management systems, student information systems, and analytics platforms, allowing institutions to focus on the content and design of courses rather than the integration of data.

IT Management and Networking

Tuesday, July 18
2:30 – 3:15 p.m.

IMN1 IT Security Is a Technology Leader’s Primary Responsibility

Glenn Setliff, Director of Information Technology, Duke University School of Nursing

Cyber criminals have become more sophisticated in their attacks, using a variety of techniques to explore vulnerabilities on multiple devices. As a result, the number of successful campaigns aimed at students and faculty is rising. Because security breaches can lead to lasting effects on the finances and reputations of individuals and institutions, every security program must begin with a complete understanding of the current threat environment. Learn the steps Duke is taking to secure not only desktops, laptops and tablets, but all devices, including lab equipment, experimental robotics, and portable Internet of Things devices that require Internet connectivity.

Wednesday, July 19
1 – 1:45 p.m.

IMN2 Using HTML5 Technology to Deliver Secure, Browser-Based Computing Environments

Jonathan Sibray, IT Director, University of Colorado Law School

The University of Colorado’s nationally recognized law school provides an opportunity for students to receive firsthand legal experience by practicing law alongside faculty members at campus legal clinics. These legal clinics provide unparalleled hands-on learning opportunities. However, security and compliance issues are major concerns. Jonathan Sibray will identify how the school successfully deployed a clientless, browser-based remote access solution to transform the clinical education experience for students, faculty and IT staff by allowing non-technical students secure yet flexible access to materials contained within the school’s server from their own devices in the classroom, at home and in the courtroom.

Thursday, July 20
10 – 10:45 a.m.

IMN3 Enterprise Mobile Apps: Buy or Build? We Chose Build

Kyle Parker, Senior Software Engineer for Developing Technologies, Ball State University

The buy versus build debate is a major factor in determining the software and service products a university deploys for students. Ball State University developed and continues to use a home-grown mobile app for student access to course schedules, grades, academic information and student connections. The application, bConnected, allows students to create connections with classmates and instructors using standard enterprise data. bConnected has also created an experience unlike any other app on the market, with 86% adoption by the most recent first-year class and more than 32,000 unique logins since its launch in 2011. Learn about product development, why attempts to replace the app have fallen flat and upcoming improvements, including a proposed integration with Canvas, revamped design driven by student feedback, and opportunities to connect to emerging technologies for a more personalized experience.

 
Campus Technology Expo Other Education Conferences google+ Twitter  LinkedIn Facebook YouTube  Instagram